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    [title] => Cadence Acquires Arcor Laser
    [short_title] => 
    [summary] => Cadence adds laser welding, laser cutting, machining, marking, and micro-drilling services to its portfolio.
    [slug] => cadence-acquires-arcor-laser
    [body] => Cadence, Inc. announced today the acquisition of the assets of Arcor Laser Services, LLC. Arcor is a leader in laser processing, providing customers with advanced laser welding, laser cutting, machining, marking, and micro-drilling services.
 
“The addition of Arcor’s laser expertise represents our latest investment in building a broad platform of precision technologies and supply chain services for our customers,” stated CEO Alan Connor. “We continue to accelerate our efforts to provide our customers with highly technical solutions to help improve their products and are extremely pleased with the industry-leading laser processing portfolio that Arcor brings to our team.”
 
Founded by Gary Francoeur in 2004, Arcor specializes in precision laser welding, machining, marking, and drilling, as well as turnkey systems integration. Arcor is also a leading expert in the integration of laser processes into Swiss machining centers, enabling complex fabrication at a lower cost. The company is located in Suffield, Connecticut and consists of two facilities totaling 30,000 square feet.
 
“We are very excited to join the Cadence team and expand our business,” said Gary Francoeur. “Cadence is a great complement for our current manufacturing capabilities and we serve similar medical device and industrial markets. We see strong opportunities for growth and believe that Cadence has the team and the resources that will enable us to do so.”
 
Tony Freeman of A.S. Freeman Advisors, LLC, advised Cadence and Steve Pappas, Touchstone Advisors, LLC, advised Arcor in connection with the transaction. [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-05-01 15:04:00 [updated_at] => 2019-05-01 15:29:59 [last_updated_author] => 199474 [uploaded_by] => 199474 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["313407","305379","307639","263327","306707","302326","309303","302922","309316","311445","303896","305978","312264","311669","310636","309544","308551","308542","307672","307577","306990","305917"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-05-01 14:58:48 [contentType] => ContentType Object ( [className] => ContentType [content] => Array ( ) [taxonomy] => Array ( ) [listURL] => [logoUrl] => https: [id] => 2487 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => content_types [tag] => breaking_news [short_tag] => breaking_news [class_name] => [display_view] => [list_view] => [slug] => breaking-news [box_view] => [ignore_flag] => 0 [image_id] => 0 [layout_id] => 0 [formattedTag] => Breaking News ) [viewURL] => /contents/view_breaking-news/2019-05-01/cadence-acquires-arcor-laser/ [relatedArticles] => Array ( [0] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 302922 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2490 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => 2018-11-01 [author_name] => {"name":"Dawn A. Lissy","title":"President & Founder, Empirical"} [magazine_id] => 6 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 178531 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 178531 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => MPO Summit: The View from the Top [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => mpo-summit-the-view-from-the-top [body] => It started with a wintry dusting of snow and ended in a blaze of autumnal glory. On top of a mini tour of Colorado’s best seasons, the two-day MPO Summit in Broomfield on Oct. 11-12 offered forecasts and insights into what it takes to weather changes in the medical device industry and how we can better serve our clients.

The point of the conference was to compare best practices among medical device outsourcing professionals to support a healthy client base. It featured a multi-session spotlight on innovations, challenges, trends, concerns, and education for those of us in this segment of the industry.

I was pleased to hear that rather than previous messages of “cut costs for clients at all costs,” the focus was on how to provide top-notch service through critical and value-added strategic partnerships between clients and vendors. I’ve never aspired to be the cheapest source of mechanical testing, regulatory consulting, or small-batch manufacturing. For 20 years, I’ve worked to develop a family of companies that may not be the lowest cost but are the highest value, so I eagerly embraced this change of focus from bottom line savings to top-level service.

I’m partial to this conference not just because the wonderful team at MPO gives me a byline, but also because this conference’s discussions don’t shy away from uncomfortable topics. The “elephant in the room” is always at the top of the agenda, and attendees respectfully tackle issues that are more often relegated to barstools than panel discussions.

But this was the conference for “real talk.” Previous years have included gloves-off discussions about the medical device tax, what to do about a dwindling labor pool of skilled workers who can manufacture devices, and some brutal truths about being a woman in a predominantly male industry.

I appreciate that respectful and open approach to topics that cause too many professionals to cringe. This year was no exception. From the regulatory implications of the EU Medical Device Regulation (MDR) compliance and how Brexit will impact operations to project breaking points, sessions focused on the often ugly truths behind successes and failures.

This has been a year full of mergers and acquisitions, which can be unsettling. As companies buy, reposition, and rebrand, there are layoffs, project delays, leadership changes, and other shifts that cause uncertainty. My experience both as an employee at an acquired company and as an observer from the small business space is that 1+1 does not equal 2 in these transactions. Unless an in-process project is critical, most forward movement pauses while the new owner decides the priority order of integration of systems. 

As an outside service provider, my standing with the new entity is in question in the wake of a deal. This is not a comfortable spot. As new leadership evaluates contracts, projects can be cancelled without any notice and business relationships that spanned decades can disappear overnight. On the upside, these M&A activities also breed innovation—our industry has seen more leaps in technology advancements from new stakeholders pushing companies out of previously established comfort zones. 

There was also a sobering update on the international regulatory climate and how that affects device development in the United States. It’s been common practice for device developers of new technologies (Class III devices) to first seek regulatory clearance abroad and work their way back to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Because FDA is generally considered the strictest, most demanding regulatory body in the world, device developers often pursue approvals in the European Union before the United States. But the pool of regulatory agencies abroad has shrunk from more than 90 to fewer than 70. Add to that a rush to meet the May 2020 MDR deadline, and we now have an audit queue that’s backed up past the 2020 implementation date. So new devices that could be improving patient outcomes are standing in line rather than making their way to the marketplace.

On a more positive note, more companies are taking advantage of the relatively new, under-used programs such as First in Human and early feasibility options for Class III devices. That’s paving the way for a faster pipeline through FDA for regulatory approval in the United States.

Professionals also shared war stories. I appreciated the candor and openness of Natasha Bond of Sana Health, Ben Walker of Innosphere, and Craig Weinberg of BDC Laboratories. I moderated their panel discussion, which laid out how to recognize when your brilliant plans aren’t working and how to course-correct.

My favorite quotes from participants in this session:

“The only thing more dangerous than an engineer who has never spoken to a customer is a marketer who has only spoken to one,” said Dave Nevrla, a cardiovascular medical device innovator and product marketing consultant who attended the summit.

“Knowledge comes from books, but wisdom comes from doing things wrong,” said Craig Weinberg, speaking from his experience as CEO of BDC Laboratories.

And words we should all live by from John McCloy, an engineer and entrepreneur: “If it’s not written down, it didn’t happen.”

The panel I moderated and every other session came back to the same question in some way: How do we develop connections that strengthen the industry?

The short answer: Check your ego at the door.

The longer answer: Develop deeper, more productive partnerships with clients through frequent, honest communication that leads to a team approach for problem-solving and innovative solutions. This requires a shared corporate culture that doesn’t shy away from difficult questions, owning up to mistakes, and forward focus. It’s about open dialogue that examines vulnerabilities, fears, and challenges. It’s developing trust, setting realistic expectations, and staying on the same page as you work toward mutual success. 


Dawn Lissy is a biomedical engineer, entrepreneur, and innovator. Since 1998, the Empirical family of companies (Empirical Testing Corp., Empirical Consulting, LLC, and Empirical Machine, LLC) has operated under Lissy’s direction. Empirical offers the full range of regulatory and quality systems consulting, testing, small batch and prototype manufacturing, and validations services to bring a medical device to market. Empirical is very active within standards development organization ASTM International and has one of the widest scopes of test methods of any accredited independent lab in the United States. Because Lissy was a member of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Entrepreneur-in-Residence program, she has first-hand, in-depth knowledge of the regulatory landscape. Lissy holds an inventor patent for the Stackable Cage System for corpectomy and vertebrectomy. Her M.S. in biomedical engineering is from The University of Akron, Ohio. [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2018-11-26 15:10:40 [updated_at] => 2018-11-27 08:17:58 [last_updated_author] => 195666 [uploaded_by] => 199474 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["302326","289587","283586","296472","299802","282688","289752"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [1] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 302326 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2490 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => 2018-11-01 [author_name] => {"name":"Michael Barbella","title":"Managing Editor"} [magazine_id] => 6 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 178498 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 178498 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Foregoing the Rainbow for the Pot of Gold [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => foregoing-the-rainbow-for-the-pot-of-gold [body] => Humans are groomed from a very early age to revere happy endings.

From preschool-age fairy tales with magical kingdoms and creatures to classic teen fiction and grownup television sitcoms, the species has repeatedly turned to the arts for the classic happily-ever-after that seems so elusive in real life.

“While a childish thirst for happy endings satisfies and entertains us,” British author Robert Muchamore (CHERUB and Henderson’s Boys novels) once noted, “the real world is so complex that unambiguously happy endings hardly exist.”

They do exist, just not to the extent they tend to prevail in the fictional world.

This much-debated dichotomy served as inspiration for several presentations at the 2018 MPO Summit, held Oct. 11-12 in Broomfield, Colo. Tony Freeman, president of A.S. Freeman Advisors LLC, kicked off the event with an appraisal of the medtech industry’s present state of affairs. With historically low unemployment, solid stock gains, and soaring corporate profits (thanks to tax cuts), Freeman could have easily exulted the device sector’s status quo but he chose instead to focus on some trouble spots—value-based reimbursement and concentrated purchasing power, in particular.

“There are several forms of value-based reimbursement, but the most common is the bundled payment,” Freeman said in his presentation. “The healthcare provider receives a single payment for all services and products provided. The more efficiently the service is delivered, the more money the provider(s) keep. Those who prosper under this system will be the ones who get people healthy and on their way instead of coming back to the E.R. How does this impact the device world? In a value-based reimbursement environment, if one device outperforms another, physicians and providers have economic incentives for using the superior device. OEMs are increasingly going to market stressing outcome and economic benefits of their products. Risk is shifting from providers/physicians to OEMs. “

Risk is also shifting to OEMs through a shrinking customer base. The hospital affiliation trend in recent years has shrunk OEMs’ customer base, forcing them to contend with centralized purchasing strategies. “The days of independent hospitals in the U.S. are over. Buying power has become more concentrated,” Freeman explained. “OEMs have fewer people to call on when they go into hospitals now, so they’re putting more chips on the table.”

David C. Robson, principal at Robson Advisors, maintained the unhappily ever after theme with a panel of industry executives who divulged some unpleasant service provider secrets. Among the confessions shared: Marketing claims are just...claims; engineers are often poor managers; and inexperience is costly. “If you show the customer too much of your estimation process, you always lose,” admitted David A. Durfee, Ph.D., CEO, and chief scientist at Bay Computer Associates. “I definitely size you up and will definitely charge you more money if I think you don’t know what you’re doing. I mean that seriously.”  (Editor’s note: For more details on Robson’s panel, read the Design Viewpoint column on page 18).

The Summit’s final session, however, was an even more revealing look at the industry’s underbelly of pitfalls and frustrations. In a panel session appropriately titled, “When Rain Is All You Find at the End of the Rainbow—Moving on from a Project and onto the Pot of Gold,” executives swapped personal war stories as well as tips for spotting potential trouble/complications during projects.

Ben Walker, executive director—Life Sciences for Innosphere, a Fort Collins, Colo.-based science and technology startup incubator, recounted some disappointing visits with customers over product usage. “When you are developing a product, there has to be a conversation about the form, fit, and function of that product,” he said. “For one product my company had developed, I went to visit people using the product and I found out that some were not using it. And from the people not using it, I found out that if they couldn’t get it up and running in 30 minutes, they put it aside. Customer discovery is good, but sometimes I didn’t start it soon enough and didn’t ask enough questions.”

Asking the right kind of questions is important, too. Natasha Bond, chief operating officer of Sana Health and founder of medical device development startup Ikigai Medical Development, shared her disheartening setbacks while working on both a heart replacement valve and finger prick technology for diabetics. Neither product made it to market: The heart replacement valve procedure was too complex and had no room for error, while the finger prick technology was simply not the solution diabetics wanted.

“If you talk to diabetics, you learn that their fingers go numb, so the pricks are not really the problem,” Bond stated. “What they really wanted was a unit the size of a cell phone that would hold the strips for them. In the age of advanced materials and technology, we can solve a lot of problems, but solving the right problem is a major issue. It’s about poking around the edges of what you are doing to see who you are helping. In medical device development, you have to consider the regulatory and legal requirements, as well as patient and physician need, and it doesn’t always stack up in a lot of cases.”

It especially doesn’t stack up without the right ally. Craig Weinberg, Ph.D., president and CEO of BDC Laboratories, warned of the dangers of working with inexperienced partners, noting it wastes time, effort, and money. “We are working now with a company that is looking to develop a particular test system, and they went with another company that had no experience. Here they are nine months later with nothing to show for it. Now they are looking to us to book an alternative solution. At what point do you decide that it should be your own project or seek outside effort?”  [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2018-11-26 15:17:12 [updated_at] => 2018-11-26 15:17:12 [last_updated_author] => 195666 [uploaded_by] => 142087 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["289746","296461","289741","282673","302310","263056","299796","265147","299086","289737","282672"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [2] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 303896 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"PR Newswire","title":""} [magazine_id] => 6 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 179334 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 179334 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => FDA OKs Contego Medical's Vanguard IEP Peripheral Angioplasty System with Embolic Protection [short_title] => [summary] => The Vanguard IEP System incorporates a peripheral angioplasty balloon and distal embolic filter on the same catheter. [slug] => fda-oks-contego-medicals-vanguard-iep-peripheral-angioplasty-system-with-embolic-protection [body] => Contego Medical announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted 510(k) clearance for its Vanguard IEP Peripheral Balloon Angioplasty System with Integrated Embolic Protection. Contego Medical is a medical device company developing and commercializing a suite of next-generation devices that address unmet needs in neurovascular, coronary and peripheral vascular disease.
 
The Vanguard IEP System uniquely incorporates a peripheral angioplasty balloon and distal embolic filter on the same catheter. The system protects the lower limbs during angioplasty without the need for additional devices or exchanges. The Vanguard IEP System has an over-the-wire design with a sheathless integrated 150-micron pore filter distal to the angioplasty balloon. Contego Medical's filter is the first to feature in-vivo adjustability to suit varying vessel sizes and maximize capture efficiency. Vanguard IEP was evaluated in the ENTRAP 112-patient post-market registry in Europe in which 100 percent of patients met primary safety and efficacy endpoints at discharge and 30 days.
 
"The Vanguard IEP System is designed to protect patients at high risk for embolization during peripheral angioplasty, such as those with acute limb ischemia, severe calcification, and chronic total occlusions if crossed intraluminally. It is also well suited to protect patients at high risk for complications should embolization occur, such as those with poor distal run-off," said Professor Thomas Zeller, Director of the Department of Angiology at Unversitaets Herzzentrum, Freiburg in Bad-Krozingen, Germany and Principal Investigator of the ENTRAP Study. "In our experience, the device has performed exactly as intended and we are impressed with the ease of use of the system, with no more exchanges required than in a typical angioplasty procedure."
 
"Securing FDA clearance for Vanguard IEP represents a major milestone for Contego Medical," said Ravish Sachar, M.D., founder and CEO of Contego Medical. "As the patient population with peripheral arterial disease continues to expand and become more complex, we believe our technology will play a critical role in protecting vulnerable patients from embolic events and thus improve procedural outcomes." Contego Medical now has two FDA cleared devices dedicated to improving the safety profile and outcomes of interventional procedures.
 
The Vanguard IEP Peripheral Balloon Angioplasty System with Integrated Embolic Protection is indicated for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and capture and removal of embolic material during angioplasty, for the femoral, iliac, popliteal, and profunda arteries. The System is not intended for use in the renal, cerebral, coronary or carotid vasculature. [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2018-12-07 10:34:00 [updated_at] => 2018-12-07 10:38:31 [last_updated_author] => 199474 [uploaded_by] => 199474 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["302016","300250","302305","283697","302922","296562","284246","303313","299802","301664","300322","293408","29236","235724","301046","289570","302836","115209","28717","299375"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [3] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 305379 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"Business Wire","title":""} [magazine_id] => 6 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 180478 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 180478 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Vayyar Selects Cadence Tensilica Vision for Advanced Millimeter Wave 3D Imaging Radar Solution [short_title] => [summary] => Vision DSP family executes complex imaging algorithms and processes back-end radar signals in real time. [slug] => vayyar-selects-cadence-tensilica-vision-for-advanced-millimeter-wave-3d-imaging-radar-solution [body] => Cadence Design Systems Inc. and Vayyar Imaging, a global leader in 3D imaging technology, announced that Vayyar Imaging has selected the Cadence Tensilica Vision DSP for its advanced millimeter wave 3D imaging solution. A high-resolution sensor that tracks the environment around it in real time without a camera, Vayyar’s system on a chip (SoC) covers imaging and radar bands from 3GHz to 81GHz with 72 transmitters and 72 receivers in a single chip. This enables the sensor to differentiate between objects and people, determine location while mapping large areas, and create a 3D image of the environment with very high levels of accuracy. The Tensilica Vision DSP enables Vayyar to execute complex imaging algorithms and process back-end radar signals on the edge in real time, on-chip, without the need for an external CPU.
 
Vayyar chose the Tensilica Vision DSP family for its high performance, vast instruction set, small core area, low power demands, and attractive performance/milliwatt (mW) profile compared to CPUs and GPUs. These unique attributes allow for running the full application layer inside the SoC, making complex imaging applications ultra-integrative and exceptionally cost-effective. Furthermore, using the Tensilica Vision DSP’s highly optimized compiler-profiler package and high-performance libraries, Vayyar is able to reduce development time while achieving desired performance, resulting in faster time to market. In addition, the DSP’s programmable engine helps future-proof the design, providing flexibility to Vayyar’s customers, and the Tensilica Instruction Extension (TIE) language allows the addition of instructions to improve performance for customer-specific algorithms.
 
“Vayyar has successfully collaborated with Cadence over several generations of IP cores, working in close cooperation with their development team,” said Ian Podkamien, director of business development at Vayyar. “Incorporating the Tensilica Vision DSP into our SoC enables Vayyar to achieve low latency and high frame rates for the high-speed, time-critical solutions required by our target markets. In addition, flexibility proved key, as the high-quality Tensilica Vision DSP core was easy to integrate, with first-silicon success.”
 
“Tensilica DSPs are being used in multiple radar application areas today: making driving safer with more affordable automotive sensor processing, increasing the usability of industrial robots with people avoidance, enabling easier interaction with consumer products through gesture recognition, and lowering energy bills in commercial properties with occupancy detection,” said Lazaar Louis, senior director of product management and marketing for Tensilica IP at Cadence. “Vayyar’s innovative solution uses the Tensilica Vision DSP to process back-end radar signals in real time from a multi-antenna array radar and generate a high-resolution 3D image. Tensilica DSPs deliver high performance and high-power efficiency compared to CPUs for both front-end and back-end radar signal processing.”
 
The Tensilica Vision DSP family addresses a wide range of markets, offering high-performance and power-efficient DSPs to enable processing at the edge for rich, real-time experiences. The Vision P6 DSP is designed for general-purpose imaging and occasional-use AI/neural network inference for both fixed- and floating-point datatypes, offering 4X the peak performance compared to its predecessor, the Vision P5 DSP. The latest addition to the popular Vision DSP family, the Vision Q6 DSP offers 1.5X greater vision and AI performance compared to the Vision P6 DSP, and 1.25X better power efficiency at the Vision P6 DSP’s peak performance. Cadence also offers the Tensilica ConnX family of DSPs optimized for the full radar sensor-processing chain: from the front-end raw antenna data that requires complex arithmetic for FFTs and beamforming, to the back-end object detection and estimation that requires the precision that floating-point datatypes provide.
 
Cadence enables electronic systems and semiconductor companies to create the innovative end products that are transforming the way people live, work and play. Cadence software, hardware and semiconductor IP are used by customers to deliver products to market faster. The company’s System Design Enablement strategy helps customers develop differentiated products—from chips to boards to systems—in mobile, consumer, cloud datacenter, automotive, aerospace, IoT, industrial and other market segments.
 
Vayyar Imaging is the global leader for imaging and sensing applications with its cutting-edge 3D imaging sensor technology. Vayyar's sensors quickly and easily look into objects or any defined volume and detect even the slightest anomalies and movements to bring highly sophisticated imaging capabilities to many industries. Utilizing a state-of-the-art embedded chip and advanced imaging algorithms, Vayyar’s mission is to help people worldwide improve their health, safety and quality of life using mobile, low-cost, and safe 3D imaging sensors. [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-01-09 08:59:00 [updated_at] => 2019-01-09 09:06:38 [last_updated_author] => 142087 [uploaded_by] => 142087 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["304505","304315","304247","303994","303655","300325","299507","293406","289755","303895","28620","287670","302931","28830","29217","299948","303986","301909","289737","299129"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [4] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 305917 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"PR Newswire","title":""} [magazine_id] => 6 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 180946 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 180946 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Biocoat Inc. Acquired by 1315 Capital [short_title] => [summary] => Specialty manufacturer of hydrophilic biomaterial coatings for medical devices has been acquired by healthcare growth investment firm. [slug] => biocoat-inc-acquired-by-1315-capital [body] => Biocoat Inc., a 27-year old privately held company, announced that it has been acquired by 1315 Capital, a Philadelphia-based healthcare investment firm that provides expansion and growth capital to commercial-stage healthcare services, medical technology, and specialty pharmaceutical companies.  The transaction closed on December 20, 2018.
 
The acquisition of Biocoat by 1315 Capital will assist the company in taking a more aggressive and growth-oriented approach in the biomaterial coatings market for medical devices, a market projected to reach over $15 billion by 2021.
 
"We're excited about this merger and the financial support which 1315 Capital provides. The synergies between our management team and the team at 1315 Capital were clear from the start," said Jim Moran, president and CEO of Biocoat. "Their investment and operating teams bring an outstanding track record of providing strategic support and expertise, thereby enabling Biocoat to pursue a more aggressive approach to the market."
 
Biocoat specializes in supplying lubricious hydrophilic coatings for medical devices used in the neurovascular, cardiovascular, peripheral, and ophthalmic markets to original equipment manufacturers and contract manufacturers.
 
"Biocoat's combination of differentiated technology within an expanding market and growth-focused management team makes it a great fit for 1315 Capital and we're excited to be working with Jim and his team," stated Michael Koby, Co-Founding Partner, 1315 Capital.
 
Scott Cramer, Chairman of Biocoat added, "Biocoat's HYDAK technologies offer extremely low particulate counts, high lubricity, and low friction, and this merger allows Biocoat to further increase research and development efforts while expanding the operating model to serve a broader range of customers."   [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-01-16 10:29:00 [updated_at] => 2019-01-16 10:36:09 [last_updated_author] => 199474 [uploaded_by] => 199474 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["115491","305910","305608","305409","305174","304187","304105","303297","302686","300728","300716","297145","300535","302068","302198","288422"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) ) [relatedContent] => Array ( [0] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 302922 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2490 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => 2018-11-01 [author_name] => {"name":"Dawn A. Lissy","title":"President & Founder, Empirical"} [magazine_id] => 6 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 178531 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 178531 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => MPO Summit: The View from the Top [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => mpo-summit-the-view-from-the-top [body] => It started with a wintry dusting of snow and ended in a blaze of autumnal glory. On top of a mini tour of Colorado’s best seasons, the two-day MPO Summit in Broomfield on Oct. 11-12 offered forecasts and insights into what it takes to weather changes in the medical device industry and how we can better serve our clients.

The point of the conference was to compare best practices among medical device outsourcing professionals to support a healthy client base. It featured a multi-session spotlight on innovations, challenges, trends, concerns, and education for those of us in this segment of the industry.

I was pleased to hear that rather than previous messages of “cut costs for clients at all costs,” the focus was on how to provide top-notch service through critical and value-added strategic partnerships between clients and vendors. I’ve never aspired to be the cheapest source of mechanical testing, regulatory consulting, or small-batch manufacturing. For 20 years, I’ve worked to develop a family of companies that may not be the lowest cost but are the highest value, so I eagerly embraced this change of focus from bottom line savings to top-level service.

I’m partial to this conference not just because the wonderful team at MPO gives me a byline, but also because this conference’s discussions don’t shy away from uncomfortable topics. The “elephant in the room” is always at the top of the agenda, and attendees respectfully tackle issues that are more often relegated to barstools than panel discussions.

But this was the conference for “real talk.” Previous years have included gloves-off discussions about the medical device tax, what to do about a dwindling labor pool of skilled workers who can manufacture devices, and some brutal truths about being a woman in a predominantly male industry.

I appreciate that respectful and open approach to topics that cause too many professionals to cringe. This year was no exception. From the regulatory implications of the EU Medical Device Regulation (MDR) compliance and how Brexit will impact operations to project breaking points, sessions focused on the often ugly truths behind successes and failures.

This has been a year full of mergers and acquisitions, which can be unsettling. As companies buy, reposition, and rebrand, there are layoffs, project delays, leadership changes, and other shifts that cause uncertainty. My experience both as an employee at an acquired company and as an observer from the small business space is that 1+1 does not equal 2 in these transactions. Unless an in-process project is critical, most forward movement pauses while the new owner decides the priority order of integration of systems. 

As an outside service provider, my standing with the new entity is in question in the wake of a deal. This is not a comfortable spot. As new leadership evaluates contracts, projects can be cancelled without any notice and business relationships that spanned decades can disappear overnight. On the upside, these M&A activities also breed innovation—our industry has seen more leaps in technology advancements from new stakeholders pushing companies out of previously established comfort zones. 

There was also a sobering update on the international regulatory climate and how that affects device development in the United States. It’s been common practice for device developers of new technologies (Class III devices) to first seek regulatory clearance abroad and work their way back to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Because FDA is generally considered the strictest, most demanding regulatory body in the world, device developers often pursue approvals in the European Union before the United States. But the pool of regulatory agencies abroad has shrunk from more than 90 to fewer than 70. Add to that a rush to meet the May 2020 MDR deadline, and we now have an audit queue that’s backed up past the 2020 implementation date. So new devices that could be improving patient outcomes are standing in line rather than making their way to the marketplace.

On a more positive note, more companies are taking advantage of the relatively new, under-used programs such as First in Human and early feasibility options for Class III devices. That’s paving the way for a faster pipeline through FDA for regulatory approval in the United States.

Professionals also shared war stories. I appreciated the candor and openness of Natasha Bond of Sana Health, Ben Walker of Innosphere, and Craig Weinberg of BDC Laboratories. I moderated their panel discussion, which laid out how to recognize when your brilliant plans aren’t working and how to course-correct.

My favorite quotes from participants in this session:

“The only thing more dangerous than an engineer who has never spoken to a customer is a marketer who has only spoken to one,” said Dave Nevrla, a cardiovascular medical device innovator and product marketing consultant who attended the summit.

“Knowledge comes from books, but wisdom comes from doing things wrong,” said Craig Weinberg, speaking from his experience as CEO of BDC Laboratories.

And words we should all live by from John McCloy, an engineer and entrepreneur: “If it’s not written down, it didn’t happen.”

The panel I moderated and every other session came back to the same question in some way: How do we develop connections that strengthen the industry?

The short answer: Check your ego at the door.

The longer answer: Develop deeper, more productive partnerships with clients through frequent, honest communication that leads to a team approach for problem-solving and innovative solutions. This requires a shared corporate culture that doesn’t shy away from difficult questions, owning up to mistakes, and forward focus. It’s about open dialogue that examines vulnerabilities, fears, and challenges. It’s developing trust, setting realistic expectations, and staying on the same page as you work toward mutual success. 


Dawn Lissy is a biomedical engineer, entrepreneur, and innovator. Since 1998, the Empirical family of companies (Empirical Testing Corp., Empirical Consulting, LLC, and Empirical Machine, LLC) has operated under Lissy’s direction. Empirical offers the full range of regulatory and quality systems consulting, testing, small batch and prototype manufacturing, and validations services to bring a medical device to market. Empirical is very active within standards development organization ASTM International and has one of the widest scopes of test methods of any accredited independent lab in the United States. Because Lissy was a member of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Entrepreneur-in-Residence program, she has first-hand, in-depth knowledge of the regulatory landscape. Lissy holds an inventor patent for the Stackable Cage System for corpectomy and vertebrectomy. Her M.S. in biomedical engineering is from The University of Akron, Ohio. [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2018-11-26 15:10:40 [updated_at] => 2018-11-27 08:17:58 [last_updated_author] => 195666 [uploaded_by] => 199474 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["302326","289587","283586","296472","299802","282688","289752"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [1] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 302326 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2490 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => 2018-11-01 [author_name] => {"name":"Michael Barbella","title":"Managing Editor"} [magazine_id] => 6 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 178498 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 178498 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Foregoing the Rainbow for the Pot of Gold [short_title] => [summary] => [slug] => foregoing-the-rainbow-for-the-pot-of-gold [body] => Humans are groomed from a very early age to revere happy endings.

From preschool-age fairy tales with magical kingdoms and creatures to classic teen fiction and grownup television sitcoms, the species has repeatedly turned to the arts for the classic happily-ever-after that seems so elusive in real life.

“While a childish thirst for happy endings satisfies and entertains us,” British author Robert Muchamore (CHERUB and Henderson’s Boys novels) once noted, “the real world is so complex that unambiguously happy endings hardly exist.”

They do exist, just not to the extent they tend to prevail in the fictional world.

This much-debated dichotomy served as inspiration for several presentations at the 2018 MPO Summit, held Oct. 11-12 in Broomfield, Colo. Tony Freeman, president of A.S. Freeman Advisors LLC, kicked off the event with an appraisal of the medtech industry’s present state of affairs. With historically low unemployment, solid stock gains, and soaring corporate profits (thanks to tax cuts), Freeman could have easily exulted the device sector’s status quo but he chose instead to focus on some trouble spots—value-based reimbursement and concentrated purchasing power, in particular.

“There are several forms of value-based reimbursement, but the most common is the bundled payment,” Freeman said in his presentation. “The healthcare provider receives a single payment for all services and products provided. The more efficiently the service is delivered, the more money the provider(s) keep. Those who prosper under this system will be the ones who get people healthy and on their way instead of coming back to the E.R. How does this impact the device world? In a value-based reimbursement environment, if one device outperforms another, physicians and providers have economic incentives for using the superior device. OEMs are increasingly going to market stressing outcome and economic benefits of their products. Risk is shifting from providers/physicians to OEMs. “

Risk is also shifting to OEMs through a shrinking customer base. The hospital affiliation trend in recent years has shrunk OEMs’ customer base, forcing them to contend with centralized purchasing strategies. “The days of independent hospitals in the U.S. are over. Buying power has become more concentrated,” Freeman explained. “OEMs have fewer people to call on when they go into hospitals now, so they’re putting more chips on the table.”

David C. Robson, principal at Robson Advisors, maintained the unhappily ever after theme with a panel of industry executives who divulged some unpleasant service provider secrets. Among the confessions shared: Marketing claims are just...claims; engineers are often poor managers; and inexperience is costly. “If you show the customer too much of your estimation process, you always lose,” admitted David A. Durfee, Ph.D., CEO, and chief scientist at Bay Computer Associates. “I definitely size you up and will definitely charge you more money if I think you don’t know what you’re doing. I mean that seriously.”  (Editor’s note: For more details on Robson’s panel, read the Design Viewpoint column on page 18).

The Summit’s final session, however, was an even more revealing look at the industry’s underbelly of pitfalls and frustrations. In a panel session appropriately titled, “When Rain Is All You Find at the End of the Rainbow—Moving on from a Project and onto the Pot of Gold,” executives swapped personal war stories as well as tips for spotting potential trouble/complications during projects.

Ben Walker, executive director—Life Sciences for Innosphere, a Fort Collins, Colo.-based science and technology startup incubator, recounted some disappointing visits with customers over product usage. “When you are developing a product, there has to be a conversation about the form, fit, and function of that product,” he said. “For one product my company had developed, I went to visit people using the product and I found out that some were not using it. And from the people not using it, I found out that if they couldn’t get it up and running in 30 minutes, they put it aside. Customer discovery is good, but sometimes I didn’t start it soon enough and didn’t ask enough questions.”

Asking the right kind of questions is important, too. Natasha Bond, chief operating officer of Sana Health and founder of medical device development startup Ikigai Medical Development, shared her disheartening setbacks while working on both a heart replacement valve and finger prick technology for diabetics. Neither product made it to market: The heart replacement valve procedure was too complex and had no room for error, while the finger prick technology was simply not the solution diabetics wanted.

“If you talk to diabetics, you learn that their fingers go numb, so the pricks are not really the problem,” Bond stated. “What they really wanted was a unit the size of a cell phone that would hold the strips for them. In the age of advanced materials and technology, we can solve a lot of problems, but solving the right problem is a major issue. It’s about poking around the edges of what you are doing to see who you are helping. In medical device development, you have to consider the regulatory and legal requirements, as well as patient and physician need, and it doesn’t always stack up in a lot of cases.”

It especially doesn’t stack up without the right ally. Craig Weinberg, Ph.D., president and CEO of BDC Laboratories, warned of the dangers of working with inexperienced partners, noting it wastes time, effort, and money. “We are working now with a company that is looking to develop a particular test system, and they went with another company that had no experience. Here they are nine months later with nothing to show for it. Now they are looking to us to book an alternative solution. At what point do you decide that it should be your own project or seek outside effort?”  [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2018-11-26 15:17:12 [updated_at] => 2018-11-26 15:17:12 [last_updated_author] => 195666 [uploaded_by] => 142087 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["289746","296461","289741","282673","302310","263056","299796","265147","299086","289737","282672"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [2] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 303896 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"PR Newswire","title":""} [magazine_id] => 6 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 179334 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 179334 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => FDA OKs Contego Medical's Vanguard IEP Peripheral Angioplasty System with Embolic Protection [short_title] => [summary] => The Vanguard IEP System incorporates a peripheral angioplasty balloon and distal embolic filter on the same catheter. [slug] => fda-oks-contego-medicals-vanguard-iep-peripheral-angioplasty-system-with-embolic-protection [body] => Contego Medical announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted 510(k) clearance for its Vanguard IEP Peripheral Balloon Angioplasty System with Integrated Embolic Protection. Contego Medical is a medical device company developing and commercializing a suite of next-generation devices that address unmet needs in neurovascular, coronary and peripheral vascular disease.
 
The Vanguard IEP System uniquely incorporates a peripheral angioplasty balloon and distal embolic filter on the same catheter. The system protects the lower limbs during angioplasty without the need for additional devices or exchanges. The Vanguard IEP System has an over-the-wire design with a sheathless integrated 150-micron pore filter distal to the angioplasty balloon. Contego Medical's filter is the first to feature in-vivo adjustability to suit varying vessel sizes and maximize capture efficiency. Vanguard IEP was evaluated in the ENTRAP 112-patient post-market registry in Europe in which 100 percent of patients met primary safety and efficacy endpoints at discharge and 30 days.
 
"The Vanguard IEP System is designed to protect patients at high risk for embolization during peripheral angioplasty, such as those with acute limb ischemia, severe calcification, and chronic total occlusions if crossed intraluminally. It is also well suited to protect patients at high risk for complications should embolization occur, such as those with poor distal run-off," said Professor Thomas Zeller, Director of the Department of Angiology at Unversitaets Herzzentrum, Freiburg in Bad-Krozingen, Germany and Principal Investigator of the ENTRAP Study. "In our experience, the device has performed exactly as intended and we are impressed with the ease of use of the system, with no more exchanges required than in a typical angioplasty procedure."
 
"Securing FDA clearance for Vanguard IEP represents a major milestone for Contego Medical," said Ravish Sachar, M.D., founder and CEO of Contego Medical. "As the patient population with peripheral arterial disease continues to expand and become more complex, we believe our technology will play a critical role in protecting vulnerable patients from embolic events and thus improve procedural outcomes." Contego Medical now has two FDA cleared devices dedicated to improving the safety profile and outcomes of interventional procedures.
 
The Vanguard IEP Peripheral Balloon Angioplasty System with Integrated Embolic Protection is indicated for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and capture and removal of embolic material during angioplasty, for the femoral, iliac, popliteal, and profunda arteries. The System is not intended for use in the renal, cerebral, coronary or carotid vasculature. [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2018-12-07 10:34:00 [updated_at] => 2018-12-07 10:38:31 [last_updated_author] => 199474 [uploaded_by] => 199474 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["302016","300250","302305","283697","302922","296562","284246","303313","299802","301664","300322","293408","29236","235724","301046","289570","302836","115209","28717","299375"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [3] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 305379 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"Business Wire","title":""} [magazine_id] => 6 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 180478 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 180478 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Vayyar Selects Cadence Tensilica Vision for Advanced Millimeter Wave 3D Imaging Radar Solution [short_title] => [summary] => Vision DSP family executes complex imaging algorithms and processes back-end radar signals in real time. [slug] => vayyar-selects-cadence-tensilica-vision-for-advanced-millimeter-wave-3d-imaging-radar-solution [body] => Cadence Design Systems Inc. and Vayyar Imaging, a global leader in 3D imaging technology, announced that Vayyar Imaging has selected the Cadence Tensilica Vision DSP for its advanced millimeter wave 3D imaging solution. A high-resolution sensor that tracks the environment around it in real time without a camera, Vayyar’s system on a chip (SoC) covers imaging and radar bands from 3GHz to 81GHz with 72 transmitters and 72 receivers in a single chip. This enables the sensor to differentiate between objects and people, determine location while mapping large areas, and create a 3D image of the environment with very high levels of accuracy. The Tensilica Vision DSP enables Vayyar to execute complex imaging algorithms and process back-end radar signals on the edge in real time, on-chip, without the need for an external CPU.
 
Vayyar chose the Tensilica Vision DSP family for its high performance, vast instruction set, small core area, low power demands, and attractive performance/milliwatt (mW) profile compared to CPUs and GPUs. These unique attributes allow for running the full application layer inside the SoC, making complex imaging applications ultra-integrative and exceptionally cost-effective. Furthermore, using the Tensilica Vision DSP’s highly optimized compiler-profiler package and high-performance libraries, Vayyar is able to reduce development time while achieving desired performance, resulting in faster time to market. In addition, the DSP’s programmable engine helps future-proof the design, providing flexibility to Vayyar’s customers, and the Tensilica Instruction Extension (TIE) language allows the addition of instructions to improve performance for customer-specific algorithms.
 
“Vayyar has successfully collaborated with Cadence over several generations of IP cores, working in close cooperation with their development team,” said Ian Podkamien, director of business development at Vayyar. “Incorporating the Tensilica Vision DSP into our SoC enables Vayyar to achieve low latency and high frame rates for the high-speed, time-critical solutions required by our target markets. In addition, flexibility proved key, as the high-quality Tensilica Vision DSP core was easy to integrate, with first-silicon success.”
 
“Tensilica DSPs are being used in multiple radar application areas today: making driving safer with more affordable automotive sensor processing, increasing the usability of industrial robots with people avoidance, enabling easier interaction with consumer products through gesture recognition, and lowering energy bills in commercial properties with occupancy detection,” said Lazaar Louis, senior director of product management and marketing for Tensilica IP at Cadence. “Vayyar’s innovative solution uses the Tensilica Vision DSP to process back-end radar signals in real time from a multi-antenna array radar and generate a high-resolution 3D image. Tensilica DSPs deliver high performance and high-power efficiency compared to CPUs for both front-end and back-end radar signal processing.”
 
The Tensilica Vision DSP family addresses a wide range of markets, offering high-performance and power-efficient DSPs to enable processing at the edge for rich, real-time experiences. The Vision P6 DSP is designed for general-purpose imaging and occasional-use AI/neural network inference for both fixed- and floating-point datatypes, offering 4X the peak performance compared to its predecessor, the Vision P5 DSP. The latest addition to the popular Vision DSP family, the Vision Q6 DSP offers 1.5X greater vision and AI performance compared to the Vision P6 DSP, and 1.25X better power efficiency at the Vision P6 DSP’s peak performance. Cadence also offers the Tensilica ConnX family of DSPs optimized for the full radar sensor-processing chain: from the front-end raw antenna data that requires complex arithmetic for FFTs and beamforming, to the back-end object detection and estimation that requires the precision that floating-point datatypes provide.
 
Cadence enables electronic systems and semiconductor companies to create the innovative end products that are transforming the way people live, work and play. Cadence software, hardware and semiconductor IP are used by customers to deliver products to market faster. The company’s System Design Enablement strategy helps customers develop differentiated products—from chips to boards to systems—in mobile, consumer, cloud datacenter, automotive, aerospace, IoT, industrial and other market segments.
 
Vayyar Imaging is the global leader for imaging and sensing applications with its cutting-edge 3D imaging sensor technology. Vayyar's sensors quickly and easily look into objects or any defined volume and detect even the slightest anomalies and movements to bring highly sophisticated imaging capabilities to many industries. Utilizing a state-of-the-art embedded chip and advanced imaging algorithms, Vayyar’s mission is to help people worldwide improve their health, safety and quality of life using mobile, low-cost, and safe 3D imaging sensors. [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-01-09 08:59:00 [updated_at] => 2019-01-09 09:06:38 [last_updated_author] => 142087 [uploaded_by] => 142087 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["304505","304315","304247","303994","303655","300325","299507","293406","289755","303895","28620","287670","302931","28830","29217","299948","303986","301909","289737","299129"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) [4] => Content Object ( [className] => Content [contentLinks] => Array ( ) [belongsTo] => [contentIssue] => [id] => 305917 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] => [show_errors] => 1 [databaseServer] => Array ( [key] => master [host] => 172.24.16.232 [user] => rodpub_beta [pass] => MvQQzhse92k58yA [db] => rodpub_beta ) [tableName] => contents [content_type_id] => 2487 [resource_id] => 0 [author_id] => 0 [primary_issue_slug] => [author_name] => {"name":"PR Newswire","title":""} [magazine_id] => 6 [layout_id] => 0 [primary_image] => 180946 [primary_image_old] => [slider_image_id] => 180946 [banner_image] => 0 [title] => Biocoat Inc. Acquired by 1315 Capital [short_title] => [summary] => Specialty manufacturer of hydrophilic biomaterial coatings for medical devices has been acquired by healthcare growth investment firm. [slug] => biocoat-inc-acquired-by-1315-capital [body] => Biocoat Inc., a 27-year old privately held company, announced that it has been acquired by 1315 Capital, a Philadelphia-based healthcare investment firm that provides expansion and growth capital to commercial-stage healthcare services, medical technology, and specialty pharmaceutical companies.  The transaction closed on December 20, 2018.
 
The acquisition of Biocoat by 1315 Capital will assist the company in taking a more aggressive and growth-oriented approach in the biomaterial coatings market for medical devices, a market projected to reach over $15 billion by 2021.
 
"We're excited about this merger and the financial support which 1315 Capital provides. The synergies between our management team and the team at 1315 Capital were clear from the start," said Jim Moran, president and CEO of Biocoat. "Their investment and operating teams bring an outstanding track record of providing strategic support and expertise, thereby enabling Biocoat to pursue a more aggressive approach to the market."
 
Biocoat specializes in supplying lubricious hydrophilic coatings for medical devices used in the neurovascular, cardiovascular, peripheral, and ophthalmic markets to original equipment manufacturers and contract manufacturers.
 
"Biocoat's combination of differentiated technology within an expanding market and growth-focused management team makes it a great fit for 1315 Capital and we're excited to be working with Jim and his team," stated Michael Koby, Co-Founding Partner, 1315 Capital.
 
Scott Cramer, Chairman of Biocoat added, "Biocoat's HYDAK technologies offer extremely low particulate counts, high lubricity, and low friction, and this merger allows Biocoat to further increase research and development efforts while expanding the operating model to serve a broader range of customers."   [views] => 0 [published] => 1 [status] => 3 [priority] => 0 [publish_date] => 2019-01-16 10:29:00 [updated_at] => 2019-01-16 10:36:09 [last_updated_author] => 199474 [uploaded_by] => 199474 [user_role_id] => 0 [custom_fields] => [] [custom_fields_old] => [splitcontent] => 1 [content_url] => [related_content_ids] => ["115491","305910","305608","305409","305174","304187","304105","303297","302686","300728","300716","297145","300535","302068","302198","288422"] [is_show_company_name] => [created_at] => 2019-04-09 04:36:23 ) ) [relatedSearches] => Array ( [0] => Taxonomy Object ( [className] => Taxonomy [id] => 60855 [pageNumber] => [offset] => [totalPages] => [last_query] => [last_sql] 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